ASF: the EU prohibits the importation of meat and milk from "third countries"

Submitted by bashun on Mon, 05/21/2018 - 17:07

There are small exceptions for certain types of food, UNIAN reported.

 

The EU enters into force restrictions on the importation for personal use of products of animal origin from third countries. In particular, it is prohibited to import meat, milk and their products.

Lithuanian customs officials say the ban has been introduced to prevent the infection of animals with African swine fever (ASF).

"It is prohibited to import meat and meat products (salo, fresh or processed meat, including poultry, fats, sausages, canned meat, bakery products with meat, sauces or soups with meat) to the territory of the EU camp, milk and dairy products, animals, which includes meat or dairy products," the agency noted.

Restrictions do not apply to such countries as Andorra, Liechtenstein, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland.

"We are informing that import of animal products for personal use from third countries to the EU territory is restricted, it is forbidden to import meat, milk and dairy products. The ban comes into force in order to avoid infection of animals with ASF," is said in the report.

According to the Lithuanian department, it is allowed to import, as an exception, milk formulas for children, as well as baby food. In addition, it is allowed to import special therapeutic pet food, if the amount of imported product per person does not exceed two kilograms.

An exception for import to the EU countries are products that were not to be contained in the refrigerator before the opening of the package, the products packed in special packaging of the manufacturer.

It is noted that EU countries are allowed to import up to two kilograms of honey and honey products, eggs, live oysters, mussels and snails, up to 20 kilograms of fish products (fresh fish must be gutted, dried fish, salted, smoked and canned fish are allowed). In addition, it is allowed to import up to 125 grams of sturgeon caviar.

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